TMEP 1402.03(c): Marks for a “Full Line of …”

This is the October 2015 Edition of the TMEP

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1402.03(c)    Marks for a “Full Line of …”

In rare circumstances, the USPTO may accept an identification of goods that refers to “a full line of” a genre of products. To qualify for the use of such terminology, the line of products must be in one class. The most commonly accepted situation is “a full line of clothing.” While there may be some rare exceptions, all clothing is classified in Class 25. Another example would be pharmaceuticals, which are almost all classified in Class 5. Therefore, as long as the specimens and/or other evidence show use of the mark on virtually all of these goods, the “full line of” language may be used. See 37 C.F.R. §2.61(b). It may not be used in a situation such as “a full line of hand tools.” Even though Class 8 is the general class for hand tools, a number of items that might be considered hand tools are classified in other classes (e.g., a non-electric egg beater is in Class 21 but could be considered to fall within the broad category of “hand tools”).

The “full line of” language may be used only in appropriate situations and the circumstances and specimens or other evidence of record must be analyzed carefully to ensure that an applicant who does not in fact use a particular mark on a sufficient number or variety of products in its line does not receive a trademark registration that could potentially bar the registration of another applicant who uses a similar mark on different products. If the goods are a “full line of pharmaceuticals,” the examining attorney must require the applicant to provide evidence that it uses the mark in connection with pharmaceuticals to treat diseases or health problems in all chapters in the World Health Organization (“WHO”) International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems. See In re Astra Merck Inc., 50 USPQ2d 1216 (TTAB 1999) (evidence of use on only three products does not justify registration of the mark for a full line of those products). See also TMEP §904.01(a).

Although the USPTO will accept “a full line of clothing” as a sufficient identification, because the applicant is committing to virtually all the goods described by the broad language and the validity of the registration depends on the applicant’s statement that it is using the mark on all the goods and the evidence of such use as a “full line,” the USPTO will not accept an identification of goods as merely “clothing.” In the latter situation, the applicant must identify the items of the clothing by their common commercial name since the applicant is not likely using the mark for all items of clothing and the registration should be limited to only those items of clothing on which the applicant is actually using the mark.

In some cases, it may be more appropriate to indicate that the applicant is providing a full line of a subset of a genre of products (e.g., “a full line of sports clothing” or “a full line of anti-viral and cardiovascular pharmaceuticals”). As with any identification that refers to a full line of a genre of products, all of the products must be classifiable in one class and the specimens and/or other evidence must show use of the mark on virtually all of the relevant goods.

An intent-to-use applicant who wishes to register a mark for a full line of a genre of products must clearly indicate an intention to register the mark for a full line during initial examination, and the circumstances must establish that the applicant’s proposed use of the mark for a full line of products is credible. The nature of the mark and the capacity of the applicant to use the mark as asserted should be considered in determining whether the claim that the mark is to be used for a full line of products is credible. If the applicant indicates such an intention, the examining attorney should advise the applicant that, upon filing of the allegation of use, the applicant will be required to provide evidence to substantiate use for a full line of products. 37 C.F.R. §2.61(b). If the applicant cannot do so, the applicant will be required to amend the identification of goods to conform to the usual standards for specificity.

The USPTO will register a mark for a “full line of” a genre of products only in the limited circumstances where the mark is actually used as such. If an applicant seeks to register a mark for a “full line of” a genre of products in an application under §44 or §66(a) of the Trademark Act, the examining attorney must require evidence to substantiate use for a full line of products. This is not a requirement for specimens, but rather a requirement that applicant provide evidence to substantiate the claim of use as a mark for a “full line of” a genre of products. 37 C.F.R. §2.61(b). For example, in the pharmaceutical context, proof of use in connection with pharmaceuticals to treat diseases or health problems in all categories in the WHO International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems reflects appropriate use to qualify for a “full line.” If the applicant cannot establish sufficient use for a "full line of" a genre of products, the identification of goods must be amended to conform to the usual standards for specificity.