TMEP 1904.02(c)(v): Effect of Indicated Classes – No Precedential Value on Later-Filed Applications

This is the October 2015 Edition of the TMEP

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1904.02(c)(v)    Effect of Indicated Classes – No Precedential Value on Later-Filed Applications

Article 3 of the Madrid Protocol requires the goods and services of the international application to be classified according to the Nice Agreement. The IB uses the edition of the Nice Agreement in effect at the time international registration is sought to classify the goods and services. The opinion of the IB with respect to classification prevails over that of the applicant and the Office of origin in the event of disagreement. Article 3(2).

Because the IB, rather than the USPTO, determines classification assigned to goods and services encompassed by the international registration, and because registered extensions of protection may be based upon international registrations issued under previous editions of the Nice Agreement, the assigned classes in registered extensions of protection will not be considered as controlling in any later-filed U.S. applications to the extent such classification is contrary to USPTO policy. The classification of goods/services in registered extensions of protection and published applications under §66(a) is only relevant to the particular goods and services identified therein, and should not be relied upon in other applications to support classification or identification of goods or services that are otherwise unacceptable under current USPTO practice. See TMEP §1402.14.